MacKeNZie Davis
AUTHOR - ARTIST - EMPRESS OF ODD JOBS
CLICK HERE to read an excerpt

THE SECRET AGENCY

Penelope Wyse just wants a roof over her head. To get it she’ll have to do things she never thought possible. When she unexpectedly becomes involved with a centuries-old clandestine group, and finds herself the unwilling recipient of special abilities, her worries change from where to live to how to stay alive.

Set in San Francisco, THE SECRET AGENCY is an adventurous and humorous Fantasy/Mystery mashup aimed at younger YA readers. An eccentric and diverse bunch of characters help Penny on her quest to recover a lost artifact and rescue a friend. 

Complete at 72K words, THE SECRET AGENCY is currently being shopped to agents. To read an excerpt, please click the blue book to your left. 
 
THINGS TO READ!

I'm always looking for ideas of what to read next, so I thought I'd share a few ideas with you in case you're in the same boat. Be forewarned, I collect and read a LOT of vintage MG/YA books.

READING SUGGESTIONS 2017 (listed most recent first):

AUGUST: I don't know if you can find this one, my copy is from 1961, a Scholastic reprint of the 1942 Henry Holt Edition. It's just a fun read and a look at life in the '40's. Ghost Town Adventure, by Rutherford Montgomery. The dean Family- Dad, Tom, Betty and Chuck are on the road, hoping for greener pastures, when they're stranded in a mountain ghost town. 

JULY: What? Wait. OK, I got busy. I didn't give you anything to read, and I am very, very, very sorry. But if you want to catch up, I re-read some Madeleine L'Engle. Specifically, I read A Wind in the Door, sequel to A Wrinkle in Time. It was way more mindbending than I remembered. Had to be tough to illustrate that cover!  Wow. Now- onto August!


JUNE: What was your first grownup book? Mine was "Papillon" by Henri Charrière. It was eye-opening for a naive sixth-grader from the suburbs, to say the least. Thanks to my teacher, Ed Stewart for assigning it to me - dude, you changed my life -and how I read. This month, see if you can remember "that" book - track it down and re-read it! 

MAY: It's not quite May but my website is letting me work on it without crashing so I'm gonna go ahead and put my suggestions in now while the gettin's good.
Jim Butcher's Harry Dresden series? How about The Lives and Times of Archy and Mehitabel? I'm currently poring over Adventure Time: The Art of Ooo. 

APRIL: In honor of my recent Friends of the Library cart score, may I humbly suggest that you delve into some Walt Kelly? If you can't locate any Pogo, maybe re-read some Berkeley Breathed (my fave is "Naked in the Periwinkle") or Bill Watterson (Calvin and Hobbes) -or- comics in any form. 
My writing is definitely more heavily influenced by Walt Kelly and Walt Disney than Walt Whitman. But you knew that.

MARCH: "The Wonderful Flight to the Mushroom Planet" by Eleanor Cameron. Written before we landed on the Moon, it's still a delightful read and the illustrations by Robert Henneberger are fantastic. Besides, I wrote to Ms. Cameron when I was a wee sprat... and she answered! Not only that... she answered in GREEN ink. So I have a fond place in my heart for this one.
Too juvenile for your March mood? Content yourself with anything at all from Elizabeth Peters. You can't go wrong. 

FEBRUARY: The original "Pollyanna" by Eleanor H. Porter. The "Glad Book" is actually a very deep philosophical exploration into how we affect our own happiness. Don't let the current derogatory use of the term "Pollyanna" sway you. Plus- you can find it for FREE online. I do find the somber picture used on the cover to be a strange choice tho'...

JANUARY: Artemis Fowl - CHALLENGE! Read the whole series this month. You know you can! No time? Try reading in the bathroom. You'd be surprised how much reading you can get done in just a couple of minutes... or so. 


Happy reading! MKNZ